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India rolls out red carpet for Vietnamese investors

Indian investment today in Viet Nam is close to US$1 billion and is all set to grow with the Tata Group investing around $2 billion in Soc Trang Province. — Photo pc2.vn

HCM CITY (VNS) — Economic ties between Viet Nam and India have yet to match the vast potential and huge aspirations of their leaders, officials on both sides and entrepreneurs agreed at a meeting the Indian consulate held yesterday in HCM City to mark the launch of its "Made in India" campaign.

Smita Pant, the Indian consulate general in HCM City, said India encouraged foreign investment in its market of 1.3 billion.

Vietnamese investors were also welcomed and the country had rolled out of a red carpet, she said.

"The potential is huge and as far as India and Viet Nam trade and investment relations are concerned, the business community is sitting on a gold mine, which needs to be explored."

Besides online licensing, the Indian Government has also announced new policies for 24 sectors in which it is seeking investment, including construction, health, bio-technology, ports, aviation, railways, defence, and space, according to the diplomat.

She said this month there would be a high-level Vietnamese delegation including businesspeople visiting India.

Direct flights between India and Viet Nam are set to begin in less than two weeks' time.

A memorandum of understanding for twinning HCM City with Mumbai is under discussion, and efforts are going on to open an Indian bank branch in HCM City, according to Pant.

There is opportunity for India to get more investment from Vietnamese companies as Viet Nam is becoming one of the top investors in Myanmar and its investments in Bangladesh are growing.

Both these countries border India's north-eastern region.

"We call upon you to look at India with its huge market, privatisation exercise, ease of investment, and the commitment made by Prime Minister Narendra Modi himself to welcome investments," Pant said.

Some Indian companies have shown interest in investing in wind energy, bio-mass, hi-tech agriculture, and infrastructure.

Indian investment today in Viet Nam is close to US$1 billion and is all set to grow with the Tata Group investing around $2 billion in Soc Trang Province.

Le Phuoc Vu, co-chairman of the Viet Nam - India Business Forum and chairman of the Hoa Sen Group, said India was Viet Nam's biggest market in South Asia and Viet Nam's sixth largest trading partner.

Untapped potential

Mohan Ramesh Anand, the chairman of the Indian Business Chamber in Viet Nam, said Vietnamese companies had many opportunities to invest in India.

Vietnamese companies had invested more than $8 billion in more than 500 projects abroad, he said.

Besides the traditional markets of Laos and Cambodia, they had also made significant investments in Russia, Malaysia, Algeria, the US, Cuba, Myanmar, and Bangladesh, but had only three projects in India worth $23.6 million, he added.

According to the Foreign Investment Agency, India has 77 projects, most of them small, in Viet Nam to rank 27th among investing countries and territories.

Bilateral trade is worth around $5.5 billion, and is expected to cross $7 billion by 2015 and $15 billion by 2020.

Tat Thanh Cang, deputy chairman of the HCM City People's Committee, said ties between HCM City and India were a highlight of the bilateral relationship, with trade in 2013 worth almost $700 million.

But he admitted that the co-operation did not match the potential or expectations of the two sides. — VNS

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Posted by on in Business
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - Oct 22, 2014) - Petro One Energy Corp. (TSX VENTURE:POP)(FRANKFURT:C6K1) reported on October 8, 2014 that it had closed a private placement of $3,260,842.75 on October 7, 2014 and that it had received confirmation from Korea Myanmar Development Company Ltd. ("KMDC") that that KMDC intended to wire the balance of the funds owing to fulfill its contractual obligations in respect of the non-brokered private placement announced on July 28, 2014 ("PP#1") within the next 14 days. The Company had not received those funds as of the close of business on October 21, 2014. Instead, the Company received an email from KMDC which suggests that additional time will be required for KMDC to meet its funding obligation. The Company does not propose to grant any further extensions. KMDC remains contractually obligated for the balance of PP#1 and, in addition, to advance $14,000,000 to the Company not later than November 7, 2014 for the drilling fund provided for in the July 25, 2014 Earning and Joint Venture Agreement. KMDC has not met its obligations relating to PP#1, but its obligation to advance $14,000,000 for the drilling fund has not yet fallen due. Management has considered the Company's position at length and has determined it to be in the best interests of the Company and the Company's shareholders to wait until the November 7, 2014 deadline for all of the KMDC funding has passed before determining the most appropriate course of action. Management will to make decisions regarding the Company's future dealings with KMDC on the basis of facts as they exist at that time. In the meantime, management will continue to focus on the development of the Company's assets - in particular the planned horizontal earning well near Milton, in western Saskatchewan, and a production test on the previously drilled Well SR-1 at South Reston, Manitoba, as reported on October 8, 2014. The Company will also continue to assess the potential for a further financing by way of private placement or joint venture with persons unrelated to KMDC.The Company notes that references in prior news releases to November 5, 2014 as the deadline for funding by KMDC were due to an arithmetical error, and confirms that November 7, 2014 is the correct date, being the 105th day after the date of the KMDC Agreement. The Company also notes that its October 8, 2014 press release inadvertently overstated by a nominal amount the finder's fee paid to Aberdeen Gould Capital Markets Ltd. as well as the exercise price of the finder's warrants. The Company paid $254,867.42 in cash and issued 1,019,470 finder's warrants to Aberdeen. Each finder's warrant is exercisable to purchase one share at the price of $0.25 until October 7, 2016, subject to acceleration at the Company's option if its shares close at $2.00 or higher for ten (10) consecutive trading days at any time after four months after Closing. The Company will report on further developments as they occur.ON BEHALF OF THE BOARDPeter Bryant, President & DirectorFor further information, please visit the company's website at PetroOneEnergy.com, follow the Company's tweets at Twitter.com/PetroOneEnergy and contact Jeff Stuart of King James Capital Corporation, handling Investor Relations for the Company, by telephone at (604) 805 0375 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. Forward-Looking StatementsCertain statements contained herein constitute forward-looking statements or information (collectively "forward-looking statements") within the meaning of applicable securities legislation, including, but not limited to management's assessment of future plans and operations, including: drilling plans and potential locations; expected production levels; development plans; reserves growth; production and operating sales and expenses; reservoir characteristics; the results of applying certain operational development techniques; certain economic factors; and capital expenditures. Forward looking statements are typically identified by words such as "anticipate", "estimate", "expect", "forecast", "may", "will", "project" and similar words suggesting future events or performance or may be identified by reference to a future date. In addition, statements relating to oil and gas reserves and resources are deemed to be forward-looking statements as they involve the implied assessment, based on certain estimates and assumptions, that the reserves or resources described, as the case may be, exist in the quantities predicted or estimated and can be profitably produced in the future. With respect to forward looking statements herein, the Company has made assumptions regarding, among other things; future capital expenditure levels; future oil and natural gas prices; ability to obtain equipment and services in a timely manner to carry out development activities; ability to market oil and natural gas successfully to current and new customers; the ability to obtain financing on acceptable terms; and the ability to add production and reserves through development and exploitation activities. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements contained herein, and the assumptions on which such forward-looking statements are made, are reasonable, there can be no assurance that such expectations will prove to be correct. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements included herein, as there can be no assurance that the plans, intentions or expectations upon which the forward-looking statements are based will occur. By their nature, forward-looking statements involve numerous risks and uncertainties that contribute to the possibility that the forward-looking statements will not occur, which may cause the Company's actual performance and financial results in future periods to differ materially from any estimates or projections. The forward-looking statements contained herein are made as of the date hereof. The Company does not undertake any obligation to, nor does it intend to, publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. The forward-looking statements contained herein are expressly qualified by this cautionary statement. In addition, readers are cautioned that historical results are not necessarily indicative of future performance.
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PHANG NGA Thailand (Reuters) - When Afsar Miae left his home near Teknaf in southern Bangladesh to look for work last month, he told his mother, "I'll see you soon." He said he expected to return that evening. He never did.When he reported for work at a house on the outskirts of Teknaf, a man there gave him a drink of water. Soon, his eyelids sagged and his head started spinning.When he awoke, it was dark. He had lost all sense of time. Two Bangladeshi men then forced him and seven others onto a small boat and bound them."My hands were tied. My eyes were blindfolded," said Miae, 20.The boat sailed through the night until it reached a larger ship moored far offshore. Miae was thrown into its dark, crowded hold by armed guards. He and his fellow captives survived on scraps of food and dirty water, some of them for weeks.The ship eventually sailed toward Thailand where, as Reuters reported last year, human-trafficking gangs hold thousands of boat people in brutal jungle camps until relatives pay ransoms to secure their release.Testimonies from Bangladeshi and Rohingya survivors provide evidence of a shift in tactics in one of Asia’s busiest human-trafficking routes. In the past, evidence showed most people boarded smuggling boats voluntarily. Now people are being abducted or tricked and then taken to larger ships anchored in international waters just outside Bangladesh’s maritime boundary.It’s unclear exactly how many people are being coerced onto the boats. But seven men interviewed by Reuters who said they were taken by force described being held until the boats filled up with hundreds of people in what are effectively floating prisons. Two of the men were taken to trafficking camps in Thailand."EATING LEAVES"The experiences of these men recall the trans-Atlantic slave trade of centuries ago. Miae and four other men who were held on the same ship as him described being kept in near total darkness and being regularly whipped by guards. Two men from another boat said they were forced to sit in a squatting position and that the hatch to the hold was only opened to remove dead bodies.Miae and 80 other men were abandoned, starving and dehydrated, on a remote island by their captors, who appear to have fled for fear their operation had been exposed, according to two local Thai officials who were involved in rescuing the men in Phang Nga, located just north of the popular tourist island of Phuket."Their conditions were beyond what a human should have to go through," said Jadsada Thitimuta, an official in Phang Nga. "Some were sick and many were like skeletons. They were eating leaves."More than 130 suspected trafficking victims, mostly Bangladeshis but also stateless Rohingya Muslims from western Myanmar, have been found in Phang Nga since Oct. 11, according to Thailand’s Ministry of Social Development and Human Security. Prayoon Rattanasenee, the acting governor of Phang Nga province, said that interviews conducted by police, rights groups and his own people revealed that the victims were “brought by force. Many were drugged but we don’t know the exact number,” he told Reuters.Evidence indicates that many of the boats appear to be from Thailand. The abducted men recalled ships with either Thai flags or Thai-speaking crews. In June, six people were killed and dozens injured when a mutiny broke out in Bangladeshi waters on what the Bangladesh Coast Guard described as a “Thai trawler” trafficking hundreds of men to Thailand.The Bangladesh Coast Guard told Reuters it was aware of trafficking ships lurking just outside Bangladesh’s territorial waters. Intercepting them wasn’t easy, said Lieutenant Commander M. Ashiqe Mahmud."At night they enter our waters, take the people and again cross the boundary," he said. "It is very difficult to identify those ships at sea."Ashiqe said the coast guard was intercepting smaller boats that were leaving Bangladeshi shores with people to feed the larger ships. A report in August by the United Nations refugee agency UNHCR said that in the first half of the year, Bangladeshi authorities reportedly arrested “over 700 people (including smugglers and crew) attempting to depart irregularly by sea from Bangladesh."The Royal Thai Navy, which patrols the coastline with the Marine Police Division, also said it was aware people were being held captive on ships off its coast. "The truth is they use fishing boats to transport people and the bottom of the boat becomes like a room to put the people [in], but it seems like a commercial fishing boat,” said Royal Thai Navy spokesman Rear Admiral Kan Deeubol.The ship on which Miae was held set sail with its human cargo for Thai waters four days after he was taken aboard. Others interviewed by Reuters say they spent up to six weeks in the hold of the ship anchored in the Bay of Bengal. Fourteen armed guards were aboard, said Miae.The men were forced to squat for much of their journey and sometimes had their hands and feet bound with rope or cloth. The guards routinely beat them with sticks or whipped them with rubber fan belts.Food was a handful of rice a day, or nothing at all. What little drinking water they received was contaminated with sea water. "We tasted it in our hands and it was salty," said Muhammed Ariful Islam, 22, a Bangladeshi fruit vendor who was on the same boat as Miae.A NEW WEAPONMiae, who left behind his wife and three children, said he was kidnapped. "I never thought I would leave Bangladesh," he said, sitting in a government shelter in Phang Nga.That’s a change. In the past, many impoverished Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar and Bangladesh voluntarily boarded small, local fishing boats heading across the Bay of Bengal in the hope of reaching Muslim-majority Malaysia where they could find work. Smuggling, done initially with the consent of those involved, differs from trafficking, which involves entrapment, coercion and deceit.Thai authorities say the existence of the boats in which people are being held against their will is a response to the more strenuous efforts they are making to combat trafficking. Police operations have led to the rescue of 200 to 300 trafficking victims in the past six months, said Police Major General Thatchai Pitaneelaboot, who is in charge of counter-trafficking operations for immigration police in southern Thailand.“The traffickers have become more sophisticated and cautious, partly because of the Thai government policy to crack down,” he said.The country’s military government says it is beefing up cooperation with neighboring Malaysia and has registered more than one million illegal migrant workers to prevent them falling prey to traffickers. “That’s a big step,” said Sek Wannamethee, a spokesperson for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.Human rights groups say the growing use of force is because trafficking has become increasingly lucrative, not because of any new measures taken by Thailand. Competition between a rising number of people smugglers explains why they are resorting to kidnapping, said Chris Lewa of the Arakan Project, a Rohingya advocacy group. "There are always five to eight boats waiting in the Bay of Bengal. And the brokers are desperate to fill them."Matthew Smith, the executive director of Fortify Rights, an organization that documents human rights violations in Southeast Asia, said the size of the ships being used by traffickers has increased as business is thriving and the trafficking rings are able to operate largely with impunity.THAILAND'S ROLEA series of Reuters investigations in 2013 revealed the complicity of some Thai authorities in smuggling Rohingya and in deporting them back into the hands of human traffickers.Thailand was downgraded in June to the lowest category in the U.S. State Department's annual ranking of the world's worst human-trafficking centers, putting it in the same category as North Korea and the Central African Republic. The same month, the Thai military vowed to "prevent and suppress human trafficking," after having seized power from an elected government on May 22.Five months later, jungle camps are still holding thousands of people in remote hills near the border with Malaysia, according to testimonies from two recent escapees and a human smuggler.The men and women aboard the prison ships who reach Thailand are sold for $200 each to trafficking gangs, according to one of two Rohingya men interviewed by Reuters who recently escaped from the trafficking camps."The camps are running very smoothly," the human smuggler, based in southern Thailand, told Reuters.The smuggler, a long-time Rohingya resident of Thailand who spoke on condition of anonymity, estimated there were up to eight large camps holding 2,000 to 3,000 people at any one time.The two men who recently escaped described the brutality in the camps. One of them told Reuters he witnessed camp guards gang-raping a woman.Police Major General Thatchai describes a vast and complex trafficking network in which Bangladeshis and Rohingya kidnap and trade their own people with the help of nationals from Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia and Pakistan. "It's transnational crime," Thatchai said.The United Nations refugee agency UNHCR confirmed the existence of "bigger fishing or cargo vessels" that carry up to 700 passengers across the Bay of Bengal to Thailand – a five- or six-day journey.This time of year is rush hour for smugglers and traffickers. October marks the start of the four-month "sailing season," the busiest time for smuggling and trafficking ships plying the Bay of Bengal.The Thai Navy’s Kan said most of the boats and crews were from Thailand and that patrols against traffickers had been increased in the country’s territorial waters. But Kan said the bigger boats were operating beyond Thailand’s maritime boundaries, in international waters, and so the navy couldn’t move against them.WHOSE JURISDICTION?Under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), to which Thailand is a signatory, each nation “shall take effective measures to prevent and punish the transport of slaves in ships authorized to fly its flag.” The Navy didn’t respond to queries on why it wasn’t acting against trafficking ships carrying the Thai flag outside its territorial waters.Robert Beckman, the director of the Center for International Law at the National University of Singapore, said the Thai Navy would have jurisdiction over a ship flying a Thai flag in international waters. Under UNCLOS it had a right, not an obligation, to act against someone suspected of engaging in the slave trade, he said. The “uncertain state of the law on these matters,” Beckman added, meant that navies and coast guards were “usually very reluctant to arrest persons outside their territorial waters, especially if they are on ships flying the flag of another state.”Interviews with two Rohingya, who in early October escaped from a Thai trafficking camp, corroborate the testimonies of the Phang Nga victims. They also suggest the slave ships have been operating for some time.Mohamad Nobir Noor, 27, says he was living in an impoverished Rohingya settlement in Bangladesh, near the border with Myanmar, when he was taken. One September evening last year, men with knives and sticks forced him onto a small boat that sailed all night to reach a larger vessel moored at sea.It would eventually hold 550 people, Noor estimated.They were guarded by 11 men with guns, he said. Most were Thai speakers but one was Rakhine, the majority Buddhist ethnic group in Rakhine State, where communal violence since 2012 has killed hundreds and left 140,000 homeless, most of them Rohingya.About 30 of those being held were women. "There was one woman who was very beautiful,” said Noor. “The guards took her upstairs. When she came back she was crying and her clothes were wet. She didn't say anything."Drinking water was so scarce that Noor said he drank his own urine to survive. When someone died, a small group of men was permitted to carry the body up on deck. A quick prayer was said and then the bodies were thrown into the water. “For the sharks," Noor said.ESCAPE AND MUTINYOnce, Noor tried to escape by jumping overboard during a trip to the toilet. The guards dragged him back in and gave him electric shocks with wires attached to the ship's generator, he said.Usually, most passengers were too physically weak or terrified to confront the guards. But, on at least one occasion, desperation trumped fear.On the morning of June 11, the Bangladesh Coast Guard arrived off the coast of St. Martin’s Island, in Bangladesh waters, to record the bloody aftermath of a high-seas firefight that followed a mutiny aboard a Thai trafficking ship. Desperate for food and water, passengers had overwhelmed the crew. But another trafficking ship quickly arrived and its crew opened fire on the mutineers, said Lieutenant Commander Mahmud of the Bangladesh Coast Guard.Six people were killed and 30 sustained bullet injuries. Among the injured were “two Thai crew members and one Myanmar human trafficker,” according to a Bangladesh Coast Guard statement.A record 40,000 Rohingya passed through the Thai camps in 2013, Lewa of the Arakan Project said. They are held captive until relatives pay the ransom to traffickers to release them over the border in Malaysia, she said.By early 2014, not just Rohingya but other nationalities were also ending up in the trafficking camps. In a series of raids earlier this year, Thai police found hundreds of Bangladeshis, as well as Uighur Muslims from China's restive northwestern province of Xinjiang.The camps were also the likely destination of the Bangladeshis rescued in Phang Nga. But something went wrong.They were brought ashore at the remote island in Phang Nga under cover of darkness. Phang Nga official Jadsada says he believed they were about to be transferred by road to another location, but a tip-off to the authorities compelled their captors to flee.Local officials have yet to account for another 190 passengers they believe came on the same boat as Miae and Islam from Bangladesh via the Bay of Bengal. Jadsada said they might already be trapped in trafficking camps. (Reporting By Peter Hirschberg; Additional reporting by Serajul Quadir in Dhaka and Mohammad Nurul Islam in Cox's Bazar; Editing by Peter Hirschberg and Bill Tarrant)
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The 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw Opens as the First of Six Properties in Hilton’s Myanmar Pipeline

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and Managed by Hilton Worldwide

NAY PYI TAW, Myanmar and MCLEAN, Va. - OCTOBER 21, 2014 - Hilton Worldwide today made its debut in Myanmar with the opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw, in the country's capital city. Set amid lush tropical landscaped gardens, the 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw spans more than 100 acres of land and is situated within the developing Dekhina Thiri Township.

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport. The hotel is also located near Ruby Hall, the meetings and conventions venue at which the upcoming Ninth East Asia Summit will be held in November 2014.

"The opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw today is a very significant milestone for Hilton Worldwide; it marks the entry of the company into the dynamic and emerging market of Myanmar," said Martin Rinck, president, Asia Pacific, Hilton Worldwide. "Being one of the first international hospitality companies to enter many different countries in Asia Pacific - including Japan 51 years ago, China 26 years ago and Myanmar today - we continue to explore new frontiers, being where the world's business and leisure travelers want to be."

"Hilton Hotels & Resorts is a brand that travelers worldwide have grown to recognize and trust as a preferred hotel brand. Building on the pioneering spirit of our founder, Conrad Hilton, we are thrilled to be one of the first global hospitality companies to fly our flag in Myanmar," said Rob Palleschi, global head, full service brands, Hilton Worldwide. "With more than 550 properties across six continents, our global presence has enabled us to offer culturally-relevant, high quality hospitality experiences wherever our travelers decide to visit, both for business and leisure."

To cater to Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events (MICE), Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers five function spaces including a standing reception area that can accommodate up to 410 people in the 458 square-meter ballroom. A business center is also available for guests to stay connected and productive throughout their stay.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers three restaurant and bar options, as well as in-room dining round the clock. The Elements, an all-day dining restaurant, offers a blend of flavors and cultures featuring local, Asian and international fare. The Axis Lounge, the hotel's lobby lounge provides a cozy setting for people to connect over teas, coffees and food throughout the day. Guests relaxing by the pool under the cabanas can enjoy refreshments from Boardwalk, the hotel's poolside bar.

All 202 rooms and suites are spacious and well-appointed with Wi-Fi capabilities as well as flat-screen televisions offering satellite TV channels. The hotel offers a wide selection of rooms and suites including one-bedroom suites, two-bedroom suites and two Presidential Suites. Guests staying in the suites will enjoy exclusive access to the Executive Lounge which offers complimentary continental breakfast, all-day light refreshments as well as evening cocktails. Hilton Nay Pyi Taw also offers recreational and wellness facilities onsite which include the spa, the outdoor swimming pool, the fitness centre and the tennis court.

"As we expand our footprint in this wonderful country, we are exceptionally thrilled to contribute towards Myanmar's growing travel and tourism sector, as well as its social and economic progress. Guided by our global corporate responsibility strategy Travel with Purpose®, we remain committed to enriching the lives of our guests, team members, partners and local communities alike," added Rinck.

The company's entry into Myanmar marks alignment in two key areas of its Travel with Purpose® strategy - Living Sustainably and Creating Opportunities.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw has adopted LightStayTM, Hilton Worldwide's global environmental management system, to calculate and analyze its sustainability performance. Hilton Worldwide recently became the first global hospitality company to implement the ISO 50001 energy management system globally, following a comprehensive upgrade to its LightStay system. The hotel is also using energy-efficient light bulbs throughout the property, and will recycle waste water and materials.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is also creating exciting opportunities for its team members - almost all of whom are hired locally - through its comprehensive training and development programs. These programs equip team members to offer world-class hospitality experiences in which every guest to the hotel feels cared for, valued and respected.

As part of the Hilton Worldwide portfolio, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers guests the opportunity to earn and redeem points for stays through the Hilton HHonors guest loyalty program. Guests staying at the first Hilton hotel in Myanmar, from November 24, 2014, to March 31, 2015, can earn 1,000 Bonus HHonors Points per night, up to a maximum of 5,000 bonus points per stay.

For more information or to make reservations, contact +95 67 810 5001 or visit naypyitaw.hilton.com.

Hilton Worldwide (NYSE: HLT) is a leading global hospitality company, spanning the lodging sector from luxury and full-service hotels and resorts to extended-stay suites and focused-service hotels. For 95 years, Hilton Worldwide has been dedicated to continuing its tradition of providing exceptional guest experiences. The company's portfolio of eleven world-class global brands is comprised of more than 4,200 managed, franchised, owned and leased hotels and timeshare properties, with more than 690,000 rooms in 93 countries and territories, including Hilton Hotels & Resorts, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, Conrad Hotels & Resorts, Curio - A Collection by Hilton, DoubleTree by Hilton, Embassy Suites Hotels, Hilton Garden Inn, Hampton Hotels, Homewood Suites by Hilton, Home2 Suites by Hilton and Hilton Grand Vacations. The company also manages an award-winning customer loyalty program, Hilton HHonors®. Visit news.hiltonworldwide.com for more information and connect with Hilton Worldwide at www.facebook.com/hiltonworldwide, www.twitter.com/hiltonworldwide, www.youtube.com/hiltonworldwide, www.flickr.com/hiltonworldwide, and www.linkedin.com/company/hilton-worldwide.

Contact: Audrey Wong - Hilton Worldwide - Asia Pacific

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / +65 6833 9763

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Hilton Worldwide enters Myanmar with first Hilton hotel in capital city
 
Hotels This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - 20 October 2014, 10:01

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport.

image

NAY PYI TAW, Myanmar and MCLEAN, Va. - Hilton Worldwide made its debut in Myanmar with the opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw, in the country’s capital city. Set amid lush tropical landscaped gardens, the 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw spans more than 100 acres of land and is situated within the developing Dekhina Thiri Township.
 

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport. The hotel is also located near Ruby Hall, the meetings and conventions venue at which the upcoming Ninth East Asia Summit will be held in November 2014.
 

“The opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw today is a very significant milestone for Hilton Worldwide; it marks the entry of the company into the dynamic and emerging market of Myanmar,” said Martin Rinck, president, Asia Pacific, Hilton Worldwide. “Being one of the first international hospitality companies to enter many different countries in Asia Pacific – including Japan 51 years ago, China 26 years ago and Myanmar today – we continue to explore new frontiers, being where the world’s business and leisure travelers want to be.”
 

“Hilton Hotels & Resorts is a brand that travelers worldwide have grown to recognize and trust as a preferred hotel brand. Building on the pioneering spirit of our founder, Conrad Hilton, we are thrilled to be one of the first global hospitality companies to fly our flag in Myanmar,” said Rob Palleschi, global head, full service brands, Hilton Worldwide. “With more than 550 properties across six continents, our global presence has enabled us to offer culturally-relevant, high quality hospitality experiences wherever our travelers decide to visit, both for business and leisure.”
 

To cater to Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events (MICE), Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers five function spaces including a standing reception area that can accommodate up to 410 people in the 458 square-meter ballroom. A business center is also available for guests to stay connected and productive throughout their stay.
 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers three restaurant and bar options, as well as in-room dining round the clock. The Elements, an all-day dining restaurant, offers a blend of flavors and cultures featuring local, Asian and international fare. The Axis Lounge, the hotel’s lobby lounge provides a cozy setting for people to connect over teas, coffees and food throughout the day. Guests relaxing by the pool under the cabanas can enjoy refreshments from Boardwalk, the hotel’s poolside bar.
 

All 202 rooms and suites are spacious and well-appointed with Wi-Fi capabilities as well as flat-screen televisions offering satellite TV channels. The hotel offers a wide selection of rooms and suites including one-bedroom suites, two-bedroom suites and two Presidential Suites. Guests staying in the suites will enjoy exclusive access to the Executive Lounge which offers complimentary continental breakfast, all-day light refreshments as well as evening cocktails. Hilton Nay Pyi Taw also offers recreational and wellness facilities onsite which include the spa, the outdoor swimming pool, the fitness centre and the tennis court.
 

“As we expand our footprint in this wonderful country, we are exceptionally thrilled to contribute towards Myanmar’s growing travel and tourism sector, as well as its social and economic progress. Guided by our global corporate responsibility strategy Travel with Purpose®, we remain committed to enriching the lives of our guests, team members, partners and local communities alike,” added Rinck.
 

The company’s entry into Myanmar marks alignment in two key areas of its Travel with Purpose strategy – Living Sustainably and Creating Opportunities.

 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw has adopted LightStay, Hilton Worldwide’s global environmental management system, to calculate and analyze its sustainability performance. Hilton Worldwide recently became the first global hospitality company to implement the ISO 50001 energy management system globally, following a comprehensive upgrade to its LightStay system. The hotel is also using energy-efficient light bulbs throughout the property, and will recycle waste water and materials.

 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is also creating exciting opportunities for its team members – almost all of whom are hired locally – through its comprehensive training and development programs. These programs equip team members to offer world-class hospitality experiences in which every guest to the hotel feels cared for, valued and respected. 
 

As part of the Hilton Worldwide portfolio, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers guests the opportunity to earn and redeem points for stays through the Hilton HHonors guest loyalty program. Guests staying at the first Hilton hotel in Myanmar, from November 24, 2014, to March 31, 2015, can earn 1,000 Bonus HHonors Points per night, up to a maximum of 5,000 bonus points per stay.

 

Photo caption: Hilton Nay Pyi Taw lobby, © Hilton Worldwide
 

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Information Technology Consultant (International Technical Advisor), Yangon and Participating Townships, Myanmar
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Aung San Suu Kyi announces Myanmar opposition party to enter 2015 general election
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