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Posted by on in Business
 

As Myanmar’s real estate market booms, there are increasing complaints of land confiscation from people who say they are being illegally evicted from their property and cut out of huge profits. An industrial development zone just outside of the city has become a flashpoint.

Signs of development in Yangon affirm the government’s aim of opening the country to international business.
 
But around the Thilawa Special Economic zone, a joint Myanmar, also known as Burma, - Japan project for foreign manufacturers, there is controversy.
 
Thousands of locals say the military began illegally confiscating their land deeds more than 20 years ago, and now that it has become valuable they are being evicted.
 
Saw Min is among a group of villagers who say they had more than 320 hectares of farmland taken by the military.
 
Her family was forced to re-locate to a small hut opposite her property, which is now becoming a multi-million dollar condo complex.  With nowhere else to go, she is trying all legal options to try to get compensated.
 
"They claimed that we didn't have a legal ownership of lands and they forced us to leave here by giving orders and warning notices," she explained. "I cannot move from here as I don't have an other place to move in. Now, we keep defending our lands by showing ownership documents and sending letter to U Shwe Mann [Chairman of Parliament]."

The story is the same with thousands of others.
 
President Thein Sein has pledged investigations into all land grab accusations, but many rights groups say the government efforts fall short. They are calling on foreign companies investing in developments in Myanmar to do a better job of determining the legal authority for land purchases.
 
In the meantime, the property laws are in flux, and the future remains uncertain for those like Tamya Tay who have been displaced by the building boom. "If I don't get a compensation, I don't know how to claim for it. I don't have a husband, I also don't understand much about laws and my legal rights. I hope that I will get a compensation when other neighbors get it," she stated.
 
Community leader Makon Suha, who says he lost nearly 20 hectares of land to the economic zone, is pushing to have a member of parliament take up their complaints with the Farmlands Investigation Committee.
 
But despite the president’s promises of compensation, locals say they are still pessimistic that they will be compensated for the land they farmed for decades.

"I don't understand about laws, land rights and leasehold rights, that's why, they are cheating on us as they wish. We, all Myanmar ordinary people, are suffering a lot. Only cronies of military junta are having good opportunities here," Makon Suha said.

With development and foreign investment rapidly advancing in Myanmar, the land grab cases are a test for whether the country’s economic policies are lifting many people’s incomes, or just a few.

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The 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw Opens as the First of Six Properties in Hilton’s Myanmar Pipeline

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and Managed by Hilton Worldwide

NAY PYI TAW, Myanmar and MCLEAN, Va. - OCTOBER 21, 2014 - Hilton Worldwide today made its debut in Myanmar with the opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw, in the country's capital city. Set amid lush tropical landscaped gardens, the 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw spans more than 100 acres of land and is situated within the developing Dekhina Thiri Township.

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport. The hotel is also located near Ruby Hall, the meetings and conventions venue at which the upcoming Ninth East Asia Summit will be held in November 2014.

"The opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw today is a very significant milestone for Hilton Worldwide; it marks the entry of the company into the dynamic and emerging market of Myanmar," said Martin Rinck, president, Asia Pacific, Hilton Worldwide. "Being one of the first international hospitality companies to enter many different countries in Asia Pacific - including Japan 51 years ago, China 26 years ago and Myanmar today - we continue to explore new frontiers, being where the world's business and leisure travelers want to be."

"Hilton Hotels & Resorts is a brand that travelers worldwide have grown to recognize and trust as a preferred hotel brand. Building on the pioneering spirit of our founder, Conrad Hilton, we are thrilled to be one of the first global hospitality companies to fly our flag in Myanmar," said Rob Palleschi, global head, full service brands, Hilton Worldwide. "With more than 550 properties across six continents, our global presence has enabled us to offer culturally-relevant, high quality hospitality experiences wherever our travelers decide to visit, both for business and leisure."

To cater to Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events (MICE), Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers five function spaces including a standing reception area that can accommodate up to 410 people in the 458 square-meter ballroom. A business center is also available for guests to stay connected and productive throughout their stay.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers three restaurant and bar options, as well as in-room dining round the clock. The Elements, an all-day dining restaurant, offers a blend of flavors and cultures featuring local, Asian and international fare. The Axis Lounge, the hotel's lobby lounge provides a cozy setting for people to connect over teas, coffees and food throughout the day. Guests relaxing by the pool under the cabanas can enjoy refreshments from Boardwalk, the hotel's poolside bar.

All 202 rooms and suites are spacious and well-appointed with Wi-Fi capabilities as well as flat-screen televisions offering satellite TV channels. The hotel offers a wide selection of rooms and suites including one-bedroom suites, two-bedroom suites and two Presidential Suites. Guests staying in the suites will enjoy exclusive access to the Executive Lounge which offers complimentary continental breakfast, all-day light refreshments as well as evening cocktails. Hilton Nay Pyi Taw also offers recreational and wellness facilities onsite which include the spa, the outdoor swimming pool, the fitness centre and the tennis court.

"As we expand our footprint in this wonderful country, we are exceptionally thrilled to contribute towards Myanmar's growing travel and tourism sector, as well as its social and economic progress. Guided by our global corporate responsibility strategy Travel with Purpose®, we remain committed to enriching the lives of our guests, team members, partners and local communities alike," added Rinck.

The company's entry into Myanmar marks alignment in two key areas of its Travel with Purpose® strategy - Living Sustainably and Creating Opportunities.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw has adopted LightStayTM, Hilton Worldwide's global environmental management system, to calculate and analyze its sustainability performance. Hilton Worldwide recently became the first global hospitality company to implement the ISO 50001 energy management system globally, following a comprehensive upgrade to its LightStay system. The hotel is also using energy-efficient light bulbs throughout the property, and will recycle waste water and materials.

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is also creating exciting opportunities for its team members - almost all of whom are hired locally - through its comprehensive training and development programs. These programs equip team members to offer world-class hospitality experiences in which every guest to the hotel feels cared for, valued and respected.

As part of the Hilton Worldwide portfolio, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers guests the opportunity to earn and redeem points for stays through the Hilton HHonors guest loyalty program. Guests staying at the first Hilton hotel in Myanmar, from November 24, 2014, to March 31, 2015, can earn 1,000 Bonus HHonors Points per night, up to a maximum of 5,000 bonus points per stay.

For more information or to make reservations, contact +95 67 810 5001 or visit naypyitaw.hilton.com.

Hilton Worldwide (NYSE: HLT) is a leading global hospitality company, spanning the lodging sector from luxury and full-service hotels and resorts to extended-stay suites and focused-service hotels. For 95 years, Hilton Worldwide has been dedicated to continuing its tradition of providing exceptional guest experiences. The company's portfolio of eleven world-class global brands is comprised of more than 4,200 managed, franchised, owned and leased hotels and timeshare properties, with more than 690,000 rooms in 93 countries and territories, including Hilton Hotels & Resorts, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, Conrad Hotels & Resorts, Curio - A Collection by Hilton, DoubleTree by Hilton, Embassy Suites Hotels, Hilton Garden Inn, Hampton Hotels, Homewood Suites by Hilton, Home2 Suites by Hilton and Hilton Grand Vacations. The company also manages an award-winning customer loyalty program, Hilton HHonors®. Visit news.hiltonworldwide.com for more information and connect with Hilton Worldwide at www.facebook.com/hiltonworldwide, www.twitter.com/hiltonworldwide, www.youtube.com/hiltonworldwide, www.flickr.com/hiltonworldwide, and www.linkedin.com/company/hilton-worldwide.

Contact: Audrey Wong - Hilton Worldwide - Asia Pacific

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / +65 6833 9763

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Hilton Worldwide enters Myanmar with first Hilton hotel in capital city
 
Hotels This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - 20 October 2014, 10:01

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport.

image

NAY PYI TAW, Myanmar and MCLEAN, Va. - Hilton Worldwide made its debut in Myanmar with the opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw, in the country’s capital city. Set amid lush tropical landscaped gardens, the 202-key Hilton Nay Pyi Taw spans more than 100 acres of land and is situated within the developing Dekhina Thiri Township.
 

Owned by Eden Group Company Limited and managed by Hilton Worldwide, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is in a prime location within easy reach of the main government administrative offices and is 24 kilometers (a 30-minute drive) from the Nay Pyi Taw International Airport. The hotel is also located near Ruby Hall, the meetings and conventions venue at which the upcoming Ninth East Asia Summit will be held in November 2014.
 

“The opening of Hilton Nay Pyi Taw today is a very significant milestone for Hilton Worldwide; it marks the entry of the company into the dynamic and emerging market of Myanmar,” said Martin Rinck, president, Asia Pacific, Hilton Worldwide. “Being one of the first international hospitality companies to enter many different countries in Asia Pacific – including Japan 51 years ago, China 26 years ago and Myanmar today – we continue to explore new frontiers, being where the world’s business and leisure travelers want to be.”
 

“Hilton Hotels & Resorts is a brand that travelers worldwide have grown to recognize and trust as a preferred hotel brand. Building on the pioneering spirit of our founder, Conrad Hilton, we are thrilled to be one of the first global hospitality companies to fly our flag in Myanmar,” said Rob Palleschi, global head, full service brands, Hilton Worldwide. “With more than 550 properties across six continents, our global presence has enabled us to offer culturally-relevant, high quality hospitality experiences wherever our travelers decide to visit, both for business and leisure.”
 

To cater to Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events (MICE), Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers five function spaces including a standing reception area that can accommodate up to 410 people in the 458 square-meter ballroom. A business center is also available for guests to stay connected and productive throughout their stay.
 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers three restaurant and bar options, as well as in-room dining round the clock. The Elements, an all-day dining restaurant, offers a blend of flavors and cultures featuring local, Asian and international fare. The Axis Lounge, the hotel’s lobby lounge provides a cozy setting for people to connect over teas, coffees and food throughout the day. Guests relaxing by the pool under the cabanas can enjoy refreshments from Boardwalk, the hotel’s poolside bar.
 

All 202 rooms and suites are spacious and well-appointed with Wi-Fi capabilities as well as flat-screen televisions offering satellite TV channels. The hotel offers a wide selection of rooms and suites including one-bedroom suites, two-bedroom suites and two Presidential Suites. Guests staying in the suites will enjoy exclusive access to the Executive Lounge which offers complimentary continental breakfast, all-day light refreshments as well as evening cocktails. Hilton Nay Pyi Taw also offers recreational and wellness facilities onsite which include the spa, the outdoor swimming pool, the fitness centre and the tennis court.
 

“As we expand our footprint in this wonderful country, we are exceptionally thrilled to contribute towards Myanmar’s growing travel and tourism sector, as well as its social and economic progress. Guided by our global corporate responsibility strategy Travel with Purpose®, we remain committed to enriching the lives of our guests, team members, partners and local communities alike,” added Rinck.
 

The company’s entry into Myanmar marks alignment in two key areas of its Travel with Purpose strategy – Living Sustainably and Creating Opportunities.

 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw has adopted LightStay, Hilton Worldwide’s global environmental management system, to calculate and analyze its sustainability performance. Hilton Worldwide recently became the first global hospitality company to implement the ISO 50001 energy management system globally, following a comprehensive upgrade to its LightStay system. The hotel is also using energy-efficient light bulbs throughout the property, and will recycle waste water and materials.

 

Hilton Nay Pyi Taw is also creating exciting opportunities for its team members – almost all of whom are hired locally – through its comprehensive training and development programs. These programs equip team members to offer world-class hospitality experiences in which every guest to the hotel feels cared for, valued and respected. 
 

As part of the Hilton Worldwide portfolio, Hilton Nay Pyi Taw offers guests the opportunity to earn and redeem points for stays through the Hilton HHonors guest loyalty program. Guests staying at the first Hilton hotel in Myanmar, from November 24, 2014, to March 31, 2015, can earn 1,000 Bonus HHonors Points per night, up to a maximum of 5,000 bonus points per stay.

 

Photo caption: Hilton Nay Pyi Taw lobby, © Hilton Worldwide
 

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Opportunities abound as investors eye Myanmar border areas
 
A Thai Chamber of Commerce mission to Mae Sot district last week found that Tak province's economy would continue to grow significantly as it was already a base for trading with Myanmar, as well as a gateway for Thai interests to start investment in cross-border areas - and in some of the neighbouring country's cities.

Niyom Waiyawatchapanich, chairman of the TCC s Neighbouring Countries Trade Promotion Committee, described Myanmar's economic outlook as "very promising".

Thai traders and investors should start exploring more opportunities in the country, and trading and investing along border provinces would be a great start for them, due to the low risk involved and the fact that there would be more development in these areas in the coming years.

Mae Sot district is one of the target areas for Thailand in terms of SEZ development. The government is building the second Thai-Myanmar Friendship Bridge in the district, and expanding the highway to four lanes connecting straight to Myawaddy, which is a gateway to reaching other emerging growth cities in Myanmar, such as Kawkareik, Taungyi and Mawlamyine, as well as Yangon.

Niyom said after the infrastructure-development projects are completed in the next two years, the logistics costs for shipments to Myanmar would be half of what they are today. The shipment cost for goods is now Bt2 per kilogram, but after the highway is developed, it will be just Bt1 a kilo.

The new highway and bridge crossing will also save time for shipments. The delivery time for goods from Mae Sot to Kawkareik is currently about three hours, but after the highway is ready, this will be reduced to just 50 minutes.

To facilitate more trade and investment growth on both sides, Niyom called for the two governments to set up similar customs rules and regulations, as well as expand the period that the border checkpoint is open for business and traffic each day.

Thin Thin Myat, chairman of the Myawaddy Border Trade Chamber of Commerce, said she had high expectations that trade would grow between Thailand and Myanmar under the growing relationship between the countries.

She said there was strong demand in Myanmar for many Thai items, particularly consumer goods, foods and beverages, while Myanmar could also support Thai industrial growth by supplying many raw materials, such as agricultural products.

Somsak Kaveerat, chairman of the Tak Chamber of Commerce, pointed out that trade at the Mae Sot checkpoint had soared by about 30 per cent this year, largely due to higher demand for Thai goods.

Trade value at the checkpoint is projected to reach Bt60 billion this year, he said.

Thanawat Weerasomkiat, general manager of Tha Klao Bicycle Warehouse in Tak, said there was high demand in Myanmar for second-hand imports.

Mae Sot is now a transit port for shipping second-hand bicycles to Myanmar, with sales continuing to grow, he said. Tha Klao ships 60-70 containers of bicycles per month across the border, with each container holding about 700 bikes.

Moreover, the market for used bicycles is not only high in neighbouring countries, as the Thai market is also experiencing strong demand, he added.

About 40 per cent of the company's Bt100-million second-hand bicycles business is in the domestic market.

Wason Kanchitsirikul, managing director of Highway Group - an authorised dealer for Siam Cement Group - said sales of construction materials had increased significantly during the past year to serve Myanmar's emerging growth.

Normally, the company shipped about 9,000-10,000 tonnes of cement to Myanmar per month, but recent monthly shipments have risen to 17,000-24,000 tonnes.

He said that since many construction and infrastructure-development projects were taking place in Myanmar, there was now strong demand for construction-material imports.

However, he said, Thai businesses should pay particular attention to the exchange rate when trading with Myanmar.

To ensure stable incomes, he suggested that they trade in baht.

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Posted by on in Business
Investment boom in Myanmar
 
Thailand's total investment in Myanmar has nearly reached US$10 billion, making the Kingdom the second-largest source of foreign direct investment (FDI) into the country after China, whose investment swelled past $14 billion.

Pisanu Suvanajata, Thailand's ambassador to Myanmar, reckons the Thai ranking may not last too long as the Myanmar Investment Commission (MIC) has granted approvals recently to projects by investors from Japan, South Korea and Singapore.

"Myanmar is not our choice. Indeed, it is choosing who should be allowed to invest here," he said in an interview.

On the main road in Yangon, billboards flaunt the names of big Thai companies already making their presence felt in the country - PTT, Charoen Pokphand Group, Siam Cement Group, Siam City Cement (Insee), Bangchak Petroleum, Boon Rawd Brewery, Bangkok Dusit Medical. Signs of Siam Commercial Bank, the main sponsor of the 2014 Asean Summit, are frequently spotted, though the bank was not among nine foreign banks awarded limited licences. They are side by side with billboards of other foreign companies like Ooredoo, Telenor, Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Samsung. Foreign companies have either opened offices in new high-rises or old houses.

According to Myanmar's Directorate of Investment and Company Administration (DICA), as of August 2014, 772 foreign companies have so far invested more than $49.4 billion in 12 sectors, including oil and gas, manufacturing, mining, hotels and tourism, transport and logistics, real estate, livestock and fisheries, agriculture, construction and services. As of June, more than 700 foreign businesses had received permission to invest in Myanmar.

During July and August, the $2.6 billion investments DICA approved came from companies in 13 countries - China, Thailand, Singapore, the United Kingdom, South Korea, Malaysia, the Netherlands, India, Japan, Canada, Luxembourg, the Philippines and Libya.

There are 3,032 foreign companies/branch offices and 32 foreign-invested joint ventures in Myanmar. Companies from 36 countries have invested in Myanmar, with those from China topping the list with combined cumulative investment of $14 billion.

Full-fledged inroads

Foreign companies are flocking to Myanmar, spurred by the rising wages in Thailand and other neighbours and the establishment of industrial estates there, aside from political and economic reforms introduced by the administration of President Thein Sein.

FDI rose from $901 million in 2010 to $2.62 billion in 2013, according to World Bank data.

The Myanmar Investment Commission (MCI), the FDI promoter, expected FDI in the 2014-15 fiscal year, starting April 1, to reach $4 billion. In September, it revised up the target, expecting the FDI to reach $5 billion when the fiscal year ends next March. The FDI is also expected to show 14 per cent annualised growth from now until 2030, to push the aggregate amount to $100 billion in the next 15 years.

According to DICA data, not all foreign companies have fully invested the approved investment amount. While 51 Chinese companies have invested $14.38 billion in the country, 44 Thai companies have invested only $3.1 billion, making it the fourth largest in terms of existing enterprises. In contrast, the $6.5-billion investment by 67 Singapore firms made Singapore the second-largest source of foreign investment, and the $6.2 billion by 93 Hong Kong firms made Hong Kong the third-largest.

Myanmar is considered untapped as both a production base and a consumer market in Southeast Asia. For manufacturing companies, the low wage of about $70 a month is the main attraction. Meanwhile, though the per-capita gross domestic product remains low at about $900, the population of more than 50 million presents a huge untapped market for a variety of products.

Economic outlook

Economists have also been upbeat on the country's outlook.

After the 8.25 per cent growth in the 2013-14 fiscal year, Myanmar's economic growth is expected to average 8.25 per cent in the next few years, led by rising gas production and investment, according to the International Monetary Fund.

At the seminar on "Gateway to the new Construction Era" last week in Yangon hosted by Thailand-based Millcon Industry, Bangkok Bank executive vice president Kobsak Pootrakul was more upbeat on the GDP growth acceleration. As the country witnesses deeper trade integration and FDIs, he expects more than 10 per cent growth rate in the next 10 years.

"The IMF expects FDI to Myanmar to grow by $5 billion per annum in the next 5 years. Personally, I expect it to be $8 billion per year, judging from conversation with potential investors who have shown their interest in investing in the country," he told the audience.

The Thilawa Special Economic Zone (SEZ) will be the turning point for FDI in the country, Kobsak noted.

"Most investors are concerned about infrastructure and land difficulties. Once completed, Thilawa should ease the concerns," he said.

Industrial estates

Located about 20 kilometres southeast of Yangon, Thilawa is one of three major SEZs planned by the Thein Sein government to boost foreign investment, aside from Dawei, south of Yangon, and Kyaukpyu, in Rakhine state. Among the three, Thilawa - covering 2,400 hectares - has shown the fastest development, with construction work for the second phase starting on October 1 this year for completion in the middle of 2016.

"The work is slow due to heavier rainfall than in Thailand," said Takashi Yanai, president and CEO of Myanmar Japan Thilawa Development Ltd which develops the zone.

In his presentation to Thai investors last week, he said that 23 companies from nine countries have signed contracts to construct factories in Thilawa, including two companies from Thailand and three from Taiwan. Two Myanmar companies are among them.

He acknowledged that the infrastructure is a major concern. Thilawa Port is being improved while a 50-megawatt power plant will be constructed to ensure sufficient power supplies to all manufacturers. A new power substation will be built aside from an existing one, while the distribution grid will be improved. The road around the area is being expanded, while gas pipelines and water pipelines would be extended to the area.

"The infrastructure will be more like in Thailand and my intention is to have more companies from Thailand," Yanai said.

Sumitomo Corp, Marubeni Corp and Mitsubishi Corp are leading the Thilawa project in cooperation with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). It is designed to accommodate green manufacturing, while Kyaukpyu will be home to petrochemical industries.

According to Thai Ambassador Pisanu, Japan's role in Thilawa has provided assurance to potential investors. In the interview, he added that the Myanmar and Thai governments would resume joint operations on Dawei in November, after the project had been halted since last year because Italian-Thai Development decided to reduce its role from a 75-year concessionaire to a developer.

"Dawei is the most complicated project among the three, designed to house heavy industries," he said. "But it is among the three mega-sites strategically designed to support the radical changes in Myanmar's politics and economy."

Remaining risks

While infrastructure such as power supply and communications are still unstable in Myanmar, other risks of doing business there remain significant.

Toshikazu Gocho, a foreign investment adviser at the Japan External Trade Organisation's office in Yangon, told The Yomiuri Shimbun recently that the government is loosening restrictions on foreign funding of retail operations, but "there are many difficult cases". He referred to such problems as administration officials not acting in accordance with the law.

Another problem involves the lack of luxury hotels, even in Yangon, which business clients from overseas tend to use.

Bangkok Bank's Kobsak said at the seminar that Myanmar would sustain the economic growth only through the improvement of road and rail networks as well as electricity supply. Meanwhile, the government must also follow the right policies, to balance infrastructure investment and long-term economic cost. Excessive investment could cause heavy fiscal burden, as Myanmar is witnessing fiscal deficit. Meanwhile, huge FDIs would encourage local companies to invest more, but excessive loan growth - over 20 per cent in the past few years - could weaken the financial sector. Authorities should also respond to the requirement for more skilled labour.

"Myanmar should get the economic foundation right and this must be done in 10 years, compared to 30 years in Thailand and 20 years in Vietnam," he said. "If this is achieved, Myanmar should see the next golden decade."

According to Pisanu, some laws are outdated but Myanmar has been acting fast. What is of greatest concern to Thai investors is political stability, as the country is attempting to seal a nationwide ceasefire deal ahead of the election next year. He is certain, however, that the country would see a smooth political transition.

He was referring to the rapid changes in the past few years, which clearly showed that it is not the issue between the government and the opposition. The situation in the country is now the issue between pro-reform and anti-reform groups.

"Thein Sein and his Cabinet members are all for reforms, including opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi and the Myanmar people. Those who stand in the way will be the losers. There is the political will that Myanmar should push forward with reforms," the ambassador said.

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